Copenhagen, Denmark From Culinary Treats to Carlsberg in Copenhagen Mini Guide by Rasmus Larsen

Experience the best of Danish cuisine in Copenhagen!

source: Triposo

 
Smørrebrød refers to Danish open sandwiches. They are usually eaten for lunch and feature cold cuts (ham, salmon, etc), cheeses, and spreads on buttered rye bread. There are seemingly an infinite number of combinations of to be made as part of a smørrebrød but popular or traditional toppings include liver pâté or salt beef with raw onions and cress, smoked eel with radishes or chives, roast beef with remoulade and horseradish, roast pork with cabbage and orange, smoked salmon with lemon and dill. Try this Danish specialty at Aamans Etablissement - the best place for smørrebrød in town!

Smørrebrød

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source: wikipedia owner: Mogens Engelund

 
Rugbrød is a soursough rye bread that can vary in color from light to dark, and can be bought in whole loaves or or pre-sliced. It forms the basis of one of Denmark's most fantastic meals, the smørrebrød. Try it with cheese, jam, as a sandwich or just break some off and eat it as part of a picnic. Anderson Bakery is easily found just across from the central station but also along the beautiful Tivoli gardens (perfect for a picnic!)

Rugbrød

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source: wikipedia owner: Orfeus

 
For a city surrounded by water, there's no wonder that seafood is a popular mainstay in Danish cuisine. From pickled herring, often found as part of a koldt bord or cold buffet, to smoked salmon and shrimp, often eaten as part of a smørrebrød, there's more than just cold seafood treats to please the palate. Cod, as well as cod roe, are very popular in Danish cuisine and you'll find the fish steamed, poached and even fried and even served with fries! Smoked eel, lobster and a variety of fish are popular main courses for dinner, or often find themselves as part of a breakfast or lunch buffet. If you fancy sampling the best of seafood in Copenhagen, head to Kødbyens Fiskebar, or the Fish Bar for the best in fresh, healthy seafood and traditional Danish delights.

Seafood

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Denmark is known for it's good cheeses which can be eaten at any time of the day - breakfast, lunch or dinner, or even as an after-dinner treat with fruit and wine. Skæreost is a traditional Danish cheese and is mild in taste and commonly eaten throughout the country. Don't be fooled though, Denmark makes strong blue cheeses, they have what's known as Gamle Ole - a brand of pungent aged cheese that can be bitingly strong and is often served with sliced onion and aspic (sky) on rye bread. Denmark is also known for its Apetina, or what most would call Feta, but Feta is a protected name and limited to cheeses produced in Greece. Whether you have your cheese in a pastry, on rye bread, in an omelet or all on it's own, visit Arla Unika, Copenhagen's flagship cheese shop to see, smell and taste the best of Danish cheese, located in the Torvehallerne market.

Skæreost

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source: Triposo

 
Most people would describe røde pølser simply as hot dogs! These red sausages are found all around town, from hot dog carts to restaurants. Traditionally served with a side of bread and a serving of both ketchup, Danish remoulade sauce (which is somewhat similar to American relish and mustard), you hold the sausage and dip it in to the sauces. Then do the same with the bread. Whether as a snack, with beer, or get several for lunch, head to Den økologiske pølsemand for not only traditional Danish hot dogs, but organic ones too!

Røde Pølser

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source: Triposo

 
Akvavit, Snaps, Brændevin or Dram is Denmark's traditional liquor, or schnaps. Just as important as the food, akvavit is equally as important and often goes hand in hand with a number of Danish culinary specialties. Derived from the Latin "aqua vitae" for "water of life", akvavit gets its flavor from a variety of spices and herbs, but namely caraway or dill. It's sipped from a shot glass and enjoyed on festive occasions and holidays, or even at lunch or dinner with a smorrebrod, or drunk as a shot with a beer at night. So raise your glass, say 'skal' and head to Restaurant Told & Snaps for a true akvavit experience.

Akvavit

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Frikadeller are Danish meatballs. They are made from minced veal, pork or beef, (or a combination of), mixed with chopped onions, eggs, milk, bread crumbs, spices, then formed into balls and fried. They can be served with rye bread and pickles, with potato salad for a traditional picnic, or served as a hearty main dish with potatoes and cabbage. Enjoy frikadeller at the cosy, traditional Restaurant Klubben.

Frikadeller

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When it comes to beer it's either Carlsberg and Tuborg, but there are a number of other varieties of beer and microbreweries found throughout the country. Most beers are a pale lager, like Carlsberg or Tuborg, but then you have a Guld - a pale lager with a 5.7% or more, Hvidtøl - a Danish white beer with only 2% abv usually bought and sold around Christmas, Julebryg or Juleøl and Nisseøl which are Christmas beers, Påskeøl - Easter beer and a Stærk Øl - or a strong lager. Whether you go for a Carlsberg or a specialty micro-brew, enjoy a beer with an akvavit, while enjoying the sun in town or with a hearty meal. Or better yet, tour the famous Carlsberg brewery to see how it's all made. Skal!

Beer

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The Danes have a particular affinity to all things licorice, especially the licorice known as 'salty licorice' or salmiaklakrids. Denmark produces the largest amount of salty licorice in the world and the most popular brand is Ga-Jol. You'll find licorice in everything from beer to ice cream, but why not head to a confectionery and sample the variety of types of licorice yourself? Sømods Bolcher is one of Copenhagen's legendary chocolate and sweet shops so head here to sample the salmiaklakrids and see the other sweet (and salty) treats they have on offer. Don't worry if it's not to your liking, salmiaklakrids are very much an acquired taste.

Salmiaklakrids

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