Warsaw, Poland Baroque Warsaw Mini Guide by Arek Siara

Warsaw's palaces, churches and mansions display a richness of color and architectural detail. Unique to Warsaw, Baroque architecture is a mixture of local traditions and influences from the Ottoman Empire and Western European.

source: wikipedia

 
Wilanów Palace or Wilanowski Palace is a royal palace located in the Wilanów district. It survived Poland's partitions and both World Wars, and so serves as a reminder of the culture of the Polish state as it was before the misfortunes of the 18th century. It is one of Poland's most important monuments. The Palace's museum, established in 1805, is a repository of the country's royal and artistic heritage. Its style represents the characteristic type of baroque suburban residence built entre cour et jardin (between the entrance court and the garden). Its architecture is original, a merger of generally European art with distinctively Polish building traditions.

Wilanów Palace

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source: Triposo

 
The Church of the Holy Cross is a Roman Catholic house of worship. Located on Krakowskie Przedmieście opposite the main Warsaw University campus, it is one of the most notable Baroque churches in Poland's capital.

Holy Cross Church

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source: Triposo

 
The Krasiński Palace, otherwise known as Palace of the Commonwealth, is a baroque palace in Warsaw. It is located on Krasiński Square. The building was decorated with pediment reliefs showing the triumph of the legendary "ancestor" of the Ślepowron and Korwin Polish clans, the Roman commander Manius Valerius Maximus Corvinus Messalla (263 BC) and sculptural work, all by Andreas Schlüter. The palace was burned down and demolished by the Germans during the World War II. It was later rebuilt. Today it is a part of the Polish National Library's Special Collections Section (Manuscripts and Old Prints) from the Załuski Library (only 5% of former rich collection located in the palace, which was deliberately destroyed by the Germans after the collapse of the Warsaw Uprising in October 1944).

Krasiński Palace

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source: wikipedia

 
Church of St. Joseph of the Visitationists commonly known as the Visitationist Church is one of the most notable Rococo churches in Poland's capital. Its construction began in 1664 and was completed in 1761. The church's main claim to fame, in Polish eyes, is that Fryderyk Chopin used to play the church organ here, mainly during services for school children. The nave with main altar and 6 side chapels in Baroque style are embellished with rich Rococo decorations. There is an impressive and unique pulpit in a shape of boat and also a lot of old sculptures, paintings by old Polish, Italian and French masters (including Saint Louis de Gonzaga by Daniel Schultz), portraits of famous and noble Poles and tabernacle made of ebony and silver. This exceptional tabernacle, which initially was placed in the chapel of Villa Regia Palace in Warsaw, was donated to the church by Queen Marie Louise Gonzaga de Nevers in 1654.

Kosciol Wizytek

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source: Triposo

 
The Palace of the Four Winds also known as the Tepper Palace, is a Rococo palace built around1680, probably according to Tylman van Gameren's design, for the high official and royal secretary Stanisław Kleinpolt. In 1944 the palace was deliberately burned by the Germans after they had suppressed the Warsaw Uprising.

Palace of the Four Winds

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source: Triposo

 
St. Casimir Church was originally the Kotowski Palace, residence of the Wyszogród stolnik, Adam Kotowski. In 1688 it was purchased by Queen Maria Kazimiera Sobieska to be transformed into a church to serve the Benedictine Sisters. As with many of the buildings that were reconstructed after the Deluge, Tylman designed the church in Palladian style. In 1718 the church furnishing was completed with a profuse late baroque pulpit in the shape of a flower and between 1745 and 1748 with a rococo organ.

St. Kazimierz Church

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source: Triposo

 
Ostrogski Palace, or Ostrogski Castle is a mansion in the city center of Warsaw, on ulica Tamka. Begun by the powerful Ostrogski family who gave their name to the building, it currently houses the Fryderyk Chopin Society and Fryderyk Chopin Museum. Designed by Tylman of Gameren, the palace built on top of the bastion was to become one of the wings of a huge future palace. However, it was never completed and was bought by deputy chancellor of the crown Jan Gniński, who turned it into his seat.

Ostrogski Palace

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source: Triposo

 
The Czapski Palace also called the Krasiński, Sieniawski or Raczyński Palace, is a substantial palace, considered one of the most distinguished examples of rococo architecture in Poland's capital. The building, just across the street from the University of Warsaw, has been home to some famous people, including artist Zygmunt Vogel, composer Frédéric Chopin, and poets Zygmunt Krasiński and Cyprian Norwid. The palace now houses the Warsaw Academy of Fine Arts.

Czapski Palace

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source: Triposo

 
St. Hyacinth's Church was founded by the Dominican Order and adjoins Warsaw's largest monastery. The church is a mixture of Renaissance and early-Baroque styles. Its construction began in 1603 and it was completed in 1639. The facade is baroque, although the interior is completely modern, because very few of the original furnishings of the church were preserved.

St. Hyacinth's Church

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source: Triposo

 
The Copper-Roof Palace is an 18th-century palace. It takes its unusual name (which is less precisely phrased in the Polish original) from its copper roof — a rarity in the first half of the 18th century. Since 1989 the palace since has been a branch of the Royal Castle Museum.

Copper-Roof Palace

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source: wikipedia

 
The Leszczyński Residence - also called the Prażmowski, Pastoriusa, Rautenstrauchów or Dobrycza - is a rococo-classical home. The main facade has a decorated portal, openwork balconies with balustrades. Dating is from the lattice of the Leszczynski's coat of arms.

Leszczyński Residence

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source: wikipedia

 
Ujazdów Castle is a castle in the historic Ujazdów district, between Ujazdów Park (Park Ujazdowski) and the Royal Baths Park (Łazienki Królewskie). Like many structures in Warsaw, it sustained much damage in the Warsaw Uprising (1944). Reconstructed 30 years later (1974), it now houses Warsaw's Center for Contemporary Art.

Ujazdów Castle

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