Australia, Australia Monoliths of Australia Mini Guide by Taylor Anderson

Some of the most impressive rock formations are in Australia. Explore these remarkable destinations when travelling the Southern Hemisphere.

source: Triposo

 
Uluru, also known as Ayers Rock, is a large sandstone rock formation in the southern part of the Northern Territory in central Australia. Uluru is one of Australia's most recognisable natural landmarks, notable for appearing to change colour at different times of the day and year, most notably when it glows red at dawn and sunset.

Uluru Ayers Rock

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In Tenterfield, NSW, on the Queensland border, Bald Rock National Park is named after its most prominent feature, Bald Rock, which is a large granite outcrop rising about 200 metres above the surrounding landscape. Measuring about 750 metres long and 500 metres wide this is the largest granite monolith in Australia.

Bald Rock, Tenterfield

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source: Triposo

 
Mount Wudinna is an impressive natural rock in South Australia, that claims to be the second largest monolith on the continent. At the bottom there are several picnic areas.

Mount Wudinna, Wudinna

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source: Triposo

 
Kokerbin Rock, also known as Kokerbin Hill, is a granite rock formation located within the Kokerbin Nature Reserve in Western Australia. There are claims that Kokerbin Rock is the third largest monolith in Australia, with Mount Wudinna in South Australia being the second largest and Uluru in the Northern Territory being the largest. The Kokerbin Nature Reserve is approximately 40km east of Quairading and 30km south of Kellerberrin by road.

Kokerbin Rock

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source: Triposo

 
Mount Conner, also known as Attila and Artilla, and occasionally found as Mount Connor, is an Australian mountain located in the southwest corner of the Northern Territory, 75km southeast of Lake Amadeus at the border of the vast Curtin Springs cattle station. It reaches to 859m above sea level and to 300m above ground level.

Mount Conner

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source: Triposo

 
Kata Tjuta, sometimes written Tjuṯa and also known as Mount Olga (or colloquially as The Olgas), are a group of large domed rock formations, or bornhardts, located about 365km southwest of Alice Springs.

Kata Tjuta

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Wallabadah Rock is a large plug (959 m high) from an extinct volcano.

Wallabadah Rock, New South Wales

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Pine Mountain is a gigantic monolith, said to be 1.5 times bigger than Uluru, situated in the Burrowa-Pine Mountain National Park in Victoria. The gigantic granite monolith reached its present height of 1062m more than 2 million years ago. The Mountain features a diverse range of vegetation.

Pine Mountain, Victoria

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In the quiet beach town of Coolum in Queensland, Mount Coolum is a monolith mountain, part of the national park in a suburb of the same name. Created 26 million years ago, Mount Coolum is a laccolith, formed when a dome-shaped bulge of magma cooled below the Earth’s surface. It rose abruptly from the coastal plain to a 208m high peak.

Mount Coolum, Coolum

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source: Triposo

 
Walga Rock claims to be the second largest monolith in Australia. Located about 50 kilometres south-west of Cue, Western Australia, it contains a cave with an extensive gallery of Indigenous art.

Walga Rock

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source: Triposo

 
Mount Augustus National Park is located 852 km north of Perth, in the Gascoyne region of Western Australia. Mount Augustus is the feature around which the national park is based but interestingly enough, it's an inselberg or monocline, not a monolith as often stated in tourist literature.

Mount Augustus

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