Saint-Léon-sur-Vézère, France Montmartre & Moreau City walk by Tara Anbudaiyan

By the early 1900s, Montmartre was the center of artistic and intellectual life in Paris. Pay homage to its former residents and discover the city views that undoubtedly inspired them on this itinerary from Compass & Key.

le Bal Cafe

 
Start your afternoon with inventive British cuisine at le Bal Café, part of a unique exhibition space dedicated to the image in all of its forms. The New York Times enjoyed it a few years back and we're betting you will too. Don't overlook the bookstore. The cafe is open Wednesday-Friday from 12p and Saturday/Sunday from 11a.

le Bal Cafe

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Cimitière de Montmartre

 
From Le Bal, walk seven minutes to Rue Caulaincourt and find the stairway that takes you below the street (entrance next to Café Au Père Rousseau). Cross under the street and you will find the entrance to Cimitière de Montmartre. Opened in 1825, it is the third largest cemetery with famous residents including novelist Émile Zola, painter Gustave Moreau, composer Berlioz, and singer Dalida, whose grave is the most visited.

Cimitière de Montmartre

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Gontran Cherrier Boulangerie

 
One can never have enough bread, especially after all that walking in the cemetery. So indulge in a delightful croissant or pastry from this artisan boulangerie, Gontran Cherrier. Closed Wednesdays.

Gontran Cherrier Boulangerie

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Musée de Montmartre

 
Walk ten minutes from Gontran Cherrier to this storied building from the 17th century, which is not only the oldest in Montmartre, it was studio and residence to Auguste Renoir, Suzanne Valadon (one of the first female painters of her generation), Émile Bernard (Gauguin’s companion) and many other writers and artists of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Relive the history of Montmartre through a fine selection of paintings, posters and drawings. Three gardens dedicated to Renoir surround the museum offering lovely views.

Musée de Montmartre

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Basilique du Sacré-Coeur

 
Sacré-Coeur is a top attraction for good reason, but by late afternoon, most of the crowds should have dissapated. Consecrated in 1919, this church was built in a romano-byzantine style. You’re rewarded with outstanding views if you’re willing to climb the 300 steps to the top. Basilica is open every day 6:30a-10p. Dome is open 8:30a-8p May-Sept, 9a-5p Oct-Apr. €6 entry to the dome.

Basilique du Sacré-Coeur

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Musée National Gustave Moreau

 
Take the funicular down from Sacré-Coeur or simply walk the 15-20 minutes to our final stop. Since visiting his final resting place earlier, learn more about Symbolist artist Gustave Moreau at his namesake house-museum, which he designed in his final years to display thousands of paintings, watercolors, drawings and sketches. Closed Tuesdays. All other days open 10a-5:15p (closed for lunch M, W, Th). €8 entry

Musée National Gustave Moreau

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