Verona, Italy Romeo and Juliet and A Glass of Wine Mini Guide by Silvia Rossi

Verona is one of the most romantic cities in Italy and probably most known for the tale of Romeo and Juliet. Check out another famous pair of the region - the red and white wines.

Valpolicella

 
Valpolicella is a viticultural zone. The hilly agricultural and marble-quarrying region of small holdings north of the Adige is famous for wine production. Valpolicella ranks just after Chianti in total Italian Denominazione di Origine Controllata (DOC) wine production. The red wine known as Valpolicella is typically made from three grape varieties: Corvina Veronese, Rondinella, and Molinara. It has a brilliant ruby red colour and has a delicate fragrance with hints of violet, almond or iris depending on the area of production.

Valpolicella

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Recioto

 
Recioto di Soave is the passito white wine from around Verona, made from the Garganega grape used in Soave. The name comes from a local dialect word, recie meaning 'ears', a reference to this variety's habit of forming two small clusters of extra-ripe grapes sticking out of the top of the main bunch, that were preferred for this wine. It seems to be an ancient wine having been cultivated as far back as the 5th century AD. Cassiodorus refers to a sweet white wine from Verona that sounds like Recioto di Soave. The classic accompaniment is Pandoro, Verona's version of panettone.

Recioto

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Amarone

 
Amarone della Valpolicella, usually known as Amarone, is a typically rich Italian dry red wine made from the partially dried grapes of the Corvina (45% – 95%, of which up to 50% could be substituted with Corvinone), Rondinella (5% – 30%) and other approved red grape varieties (up to 25%). The final result is a very ripe, raisiny, full-bodied wine with very little acid. Alcohol content easily surpasses 15% (the legal minimum is 14%) and the resulting wine is rarely released until five years after the vintage, even though this is not a legal requirement. The name Amarone, in Italian, literally means "the Great Bitter" which was originally to distinguish it from the Recioto produced in the same region, which is sweeter in taste. Both were promoted to the status of Denominazione di Origine Controllata e Garantita (DOCG).

Amarone

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Custoza

 
Custoza is a white DOC wine produced in Custoza, the homonymous hamlet of Sommacampagna in Verona province. Experts say the wine smells fruity, and the flavour is soft, delicate and savoury.

Custoza

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Bardolino

source: Tre Colline

 
Bardolino is an Italian red wine produced along the chain of morainic hills in the province of Verona to the east of Lake Garda. It takes its name from the town Bardolino on the shores of Lake Garda and was awarded Denominazione di origine controllata (DOC) status in 1968. The blend of grapes used to produce the wine includes Corvina, Rondinella and Molinara. Up to 15% of the blend may include Rossignola, Barbera, Sangiovese and/or Garganega. Other versions of Bardolino include a Superiore which has at least 1 extra percent of alcohol, a rosé known as Bardolino Chiaretto, a lightly sparkling frizzante, and a novello.

Bardolino

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Soave

 
Soave is a dry white Italian wine with a Denominazione di Origine Controllata e Garantita (DOCG), designation known as Soave Superiore around the sloping vineyards of Verona. Throughout the Soave production zone, Garganega is the principal grape variety though Trebbiano di Soave and Chardonnay are permitted in varying percentages.

Soave

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