Paris, France Impressions of St. Germain City walk by Tara Anbudaiyan

This 1/2 day City Walk has you perusing the fine collection at the Musée d'Orsay, browsing the boutiques and discovering so much more of the artistic neighborhood of St. Germain.

The Banks of the Seine

 
From a home base in the Latin Quarter, consider strolling along the banks of the Seine, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, to reach your starting point at the Musée d'Orsay. Study the ornate bridges, peek in the houseboats and admire the monuments from this unique angle.

The Banks of the Seine

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source: Triposo

 
The Bouquinistes of Paris, France, are booksellers of used and antiquarian books who ply their trade along large sections of the banks of the Seine: on the right bank from the Pont Marie to the Quai du Louvre, and on the left bank from the Quai de la Tournelle to Quai Voltaire. The Seine is thus described as 'the only river in the world that runs between two bookshelves'.

Bouquinistes

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source: Triposo

 
Come to the Musée d'Orsay not only to admire the Beaux-Arts style of this former railway station, but also to wonder at the treasures inside - arguably the world's greatest collection of Impressionist art. If time allows, grab a light meal or dessert in the picturesque restaurant, with its gilded ceilings and immense chandeliers. Similar to the Louvre, the Musée d'Orsay is open late on Thursday nights. Entry included in the Paris Museum Pass. The Musée d'Orsay is a museum in Paris, France, on the left bank of the Seine. It is housed in the former Gare d'Orsay, a Beaux-Arts railway station built between 1898 and 1900. The museum holds mainly French art dating from 1848 to 1915, including paintings, sculptures, furniture, and photography. It houses the largest collection of impressionist and post-Impressionist masterpieces in the world, by painters including Monet, Manet, Degas, Renoir, Cézanne, Seurat, Sisley, Gauguin and Van Gogh. Many of these works were held at the Galerie nationale du Jeu de Paume prior to the museum's opening in 1986. It is one of the largest art museum in Europe.

Musée d'Orsay

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Having studied the Impressionist greats, find your inner artist at select boutiques in St. Germain offering artistic wares of their own. Backtracking along the Seine you will find Sennelier, an art supply shop dating to 1887.

Magasin Sennelier

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source: Ladurée : Home

 
Making your way to Rue Jacob, step into Ladurée for the most artistic (and delicious) macarons.

Ladurée Bonaparte

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Gab & Jo

 
For original souvenirs, don't miss this colorful boutique specializing in work by French artisans.

Gab & Jo

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Faïencerie de Gien

 
The Faiencerie de Gien was founded in 1821 by an Englishman from Stoke-on-Trent, Thomas Hall. Mr. Hall wanted to introduce fine English earthenware to the French, also known as “faience” in France. 190 years later, Gien is an integral part of France’s cultural heritage, praised by many around the world. Over the XIXth century, the company became well-known as the supplier of bespoke dinner services for many aristocratic families across Europe. It has supplied over 2500 families with plates adorned with family crests or monograms. These families continue to reorder customized services for their descendants and are joined by many others now that bespoke is back in fashion.

Faïencerie de Gien

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Église Saint-Sulpice

 
Make your way to the second-largest church in Paris and the heart of St. Germain, the Église Saint-Sulpice. Take in the expansive nave, the ornate organ and the predecessor of the telescope, the columnesque 'gnomon', with an encrusted strand of brass wire representing the meridian line. Photo credit: Daniel Vorndran

Église Saint-Sulpice

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