Seville, Spain Seville on Two Wheels City walk by Tara Anbudaiyan

Discover Seville by cycle through its history and culture along the Guadalquivir River. Discover six unique sights on this itinerary using the SEVici bike share system. Download a free bike share app like SpotCycle or City Bikes, which both work in most bike share cities worldwide and show nearby stations, bike availability, and provide timers to stay under the 30-min time limit. 3-4 Hours.

source: Triposo

 
Dock your Sevici bike at station #59 and wander around Parque Maria Luisa, landscaped for the 1929 Ibero-American Exposition and named after the princess who donated the land 25 years earlier. Admire the architecture of the Museo de Artes y Costumbres and Museo Arqueologico, then enjoy a respite from the heat around the water fountains and the small lake in the center of the park. Note the Triana ceramics adorning the floral urns and water features. Follow the sounds of hoof steps to find the grand Plaza de España, the next stop on our tour.

Maria Luisa Park

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source: Triposo

 
Admire the centerpiece of the 1929 Ibero-American Exposition, the Plaza de España. Its semi-elliptical shape represents Spain embracing its former American territories. Architect Aníbal González wrote that he was interested in creating a modern interpretation of the Spanish Renaissance. The channel winding its way through the plaza can be crossed by four bridges, representing the four ancient kingdoms of Spain. Note the coat of arms above each of the 48 niches along the wall, representing the 46 Spanish provinces and two archipelagos. Pick up a bike at nearby Station #119, Avenida de Chile, and bike north along the river.

Plaza de España

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From Plaza de España, bike ten minutes along the trails on the river, and dock the bike at Sevici station #160. Head north on the same side of the street (Paseo de Cristobal Colon) and you'll come upon a large iron and glass building, the Mercado Lonja del Barranco. Designed by Gustave Eiffel (you knew the ironwork looked familiar!), this has been a market since it was constructed in 1883 through 1970. Today, the 20+ stalls of the market offer everything from fresh veggies, artisan cheese and wine to prepared cuisine, including modern interpretations of empanadas, croquetas, gazpacho, paellas and more. A highlight is the Sojo Terrace, a vast space along the Guadalquivir River, great for cocktails and people watching. Enjoy your own tasting or a full meal and continue on foot to the next stop.

Mercado Lonja del Barranco

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source: Triposo

 
Leave the bike behind for now and walk a few minutes to reach the Museo de Bellas Artes. Seville's Fine Arts Museum, established in 1835, is located in the Plaza de Museo in what was a convent dating to the 1600s. Don't miss Hall V, housed in what was the convent's church, with large canvasses by some of the most important Seville 17th century painters, including Murillo. On the far side of the Plaza del Museo, pick up your next Sevici bike at Station #61 and continue north along the river pathway.

Museo de Bellas Artes

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Camara Obscura

 
Dock your bike at SEVici station #12 to discover the Torre de los Perdigones, all that remains of an 1885 lead bullet and pellet factory. After restoration work in 1992 (as part of the Exposition) and again in 2005, it opened in 2007 with a Camera Obscura, which provides a live, moving picture of the surrounding area from its 145 foot (42m) height. Available to view by guided tour, the published opening hours are notoriously unreliable, so have your hotel call ahead to find out when tours are available. You can also admire the tower from the delightful cafe at the base of the tower. Pick up a Sevici bike where you dropped off and continue north along the river.

Camara Obscura

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Cementerio de San Fernando

 
Turn off the river path along Ronda Urbana Norte and dock the bike at SEVici Station #181. Walk behind the hospital to reach the San Fernando Cemetery, the primary burial ground for Seville since it opened in 1852 after earlier cemeteries were closed. Wander among the cypress trees lining the main thoroughfares to view the ornate mausoleums and tombs designed by prominent Spanish artists and architects. A highlight is the bronze monument (pictured here) of people carrying the coffin of Joselito el Gallo, designed in 1921 by sculptor Mariano Benlliure, whose work can be found throughout Spain. Learn more about the famous singers, bullfighters and others buried in the cemetery here. Cemetery hours may vary, posted opening hours are 8a-6:30p daily

Cementerio de San Fernando

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