Rome, Italy Roman Daily Life City walk by Tara Anbudaiyan

Envision life as an ancient Roman on this itinerary, which will take 3-4 hours. Begin by socializing with the locals at a diverse market, then imagine attending the gory battles at the Colosseum. Take time off for lunch at a peaceful garden followed by an afternoon of imaginary exercising and cleansing at the Baths of Caracalla. In other words: when in Rome, do as the Romans do.

 
If you've timed this itinerary for the weekend, start by strolling this urban market housed at the Grand Hotel Palatino in the hip Monti neighborhood, seeking out the best independent designers in the city. Snag a unique souvenir or two and chat with the shop owners about their favorite spots around town. Open weekends from September through June, 10am-8pm. mercatomonti.com

Mercato Monti

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source: Triposo

 
Walk ten minutes from Mercato Monti to the icon of Rome, the Colosseum. Imagine the cheers of 50,000 spectators witnessing gruesome spectacles as afternoon entertainment. Opened in 80 AD, the Colosseum remained in use for hundreds of years with countless men and animals perishing on stage. The structure is remarkably well-preserved given it has withstood earthquakes and misuse over time, including ransacking of the interior marble to be used in St. Peter's Basilica. Open daily 8:30am-sunset. Pre-purchase your 48-hour ticket to gain fast-track entry to the Colosseum. Audio tours available for purchase.

Colosseum

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source: Triposo

 
After braving the crowds of The Colosseum (which are tricky to avoid), walk another ten minutes to reach Villa Celimontana for a respite in this peaceful garden. Plan ahead and bring a picnic lunch to enjoy while wandering the grounds of this 16th century oasis. The Villa now houses the Italian Geographic Society. Gardens open daily 7am-sunset. The Villa Celimontana is a villa on the Caelian Hill in Rome, best known for its gardens. Its grounds cover most of the valley between the Aventine Hill and the Caelian.

Villa Celimontana

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source: Triposo

 
From Villa Celimontana, walk 15 minutes to the enormous Terme di Caracalla, one of the largest public baths to ever exist in Rome. Built in the early third century, up to 1,600 Romans met, bathed and socialized here on a daily basis. The heated baths were maintained by slaves via an underground network of tunnels. Fragments of the intricate tile work are scattered throughout the complex. The Baths of Caracalla in Rome, Italy, were the second largest Roman public baths, or thermae, built in Rome between AD 212 and 217, during the reigns of Septimius Severus and Caracalla. Chris Scarre provides a slightly longer construction period 211–217 AD. They would have had to install over 2,000 tons of material every day for six years in order to complete it in this time. Records show that the idea for the baths were drawn up by Septimius Severus, and merely completed or opened in the lifetime of Caracalla. This would allow for a longer construction timeframe. They are today a tourist attraction.

Terme di Caracalla

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